Asyra Pro Food Intolerance Test – My Experience and Results

18 comments
Profile picture of Paul

Posted 27 November 2011 15:11

by

I lead a fairly healthy lifestyle by eating healthy food and competing in a lot of sports. I’ve learned a lot about which foods are good for you, which are not so good and which should be avoided, but I have never had a test to see which foods are good or bad for me as an individual. So when I saw an offer (£59 instead of £195) for an Asyra food intolerance test, I decided to give it a try.

According to their website, the Asyra Pro can test for all these things:

  • Energetic Status of 40 major organs
  • Nutritional Assessment
  • Metabolic Disturbance
  • Dental Profile
  • Hormonal Profile
  • Parasites and Infections
  • Toxicity
  • Phenolic Sensitivity
  • Menstrual & Menopausal Problems
  • Emotional Stressors
  • Trace Minerals
  • Vertebral Profile
  • Miasm Influence
  • TMJ Stress
  • Constitutional Influence
  • Neurotransmitter Disturbance
  • Environmental Sensitivity
  • Food Intolerance, Sensitivity and Allergy
  • Vitamins and Minerals
  • Cranial Suture
  • Dental Causation
  • Herbs
  • Heavy Metals
  • NAET
  • … and much more!

Here is a video demonstrating the use of the Asyra.

My session was a three part process

  1. Answered a few questions (what do I eat for breakfast, lunch, dinner, do I get stressed, do I take medication or supplements, have I had any ill health – that sort of thing)
  2. Held 2 metal rods while an electric current was passed through my body – I didn’t feel anything while this was being done. This was done twice. They used an Asyra Pro device
  3. A brief run-through of the results, which were then e-mailed to me

What I liked about the Asyra test:

  • The session was that the test is very quick, simple and non-invasive (i.e. you don’t have to roll up your sleeve to get poked, prodded, pricked or jabbed with a needle!)
  • The person who conducted the test seemed quite knowledgeable about food and intolerances , he said he had conducted over 1,000 tests over the past year
  • The session only took around 20 minutes (mostly talking) and it didn’t feel rushed

What I didn’t like about the Asyra test:

  • The test seemed too easy – I mean, all it did was pass an electric current though my body. It seemed far too fast. I’m not a doctor and I don’t know any detail behind the science of the test (only what I’ve read online, which is an overview), but it just felt ‘too easy’ – having said that, it is a medically approved device and is claimed to have a very high accuracy
  • The technology is based on bio-energetic medicine and (according to their website) ‘thousands of years of development in Chinese medicine and over 50 years of technology refinement’. I am not a fan of traditional Chinese medicine
  • It claims to be able to test for ‘too many’ things in my opinion
  • I’m glad I didn’t pay the full price of £195!

My Asyra test results

Some points

  • Intolerance to cucumbers: I have cucumbers most weekdays (only about 5 slices, in the Pret a Manger chicken salad). The practitioner said I should try not eating any for a week
  • Blueberries: A few years ago I went through a ‘summer-phase’ of eating a lot of blueberries – to snack on while at work and every day at home. I didn’t have any obvious adverse reactions
  • Baking powder: I don’t recall ever having an adverse reaction to cake – only a compulsion to eat more!
  • Connective Tissue Resonance: I currently have a bad knee due to a sports-related injury
  • Enzyme Deficiencies (generic): The practitioner said I may lack some enzymes needed to fully break down and digest pasta. I sometimes get indigestion if I eat a lot of pasta, so I could try eating pineapples (or pineapple juice) or taking supplements

What next?

It’s too hard to avoid treats at work and at home between now and Christmas (the worst time of the year for people to try to eat sensibly), so I’m going to write up a ‘cue card’ for myself and ensure that I stay away from foods that this test says may be bad for me between January and March.

Find out more about the Asyra Test

The Asyra website (in particular their FAQ page) is a good place to start.

What else?

What wasn’t explained to me is what effects (if true) these intolerances might have on my body.

What do you think? If you have had an Asyra test, what did you think of the results? Did avoiding food that it says you are intolerant to result in any noticable difference to your wellbeing?

Also, I have e-mailed them to ask if the Asyra results can be output in a format other than PDF, but they haven’t replied. Please let me know if you know!

Post a comment

  1. Select the number 2 to prove that you are a cook, not a robot
  • Profile picture of rbargante
    i did a asyra test . looking for a second opinion? http://postimg.org/image/wyj1d8adv/
    Posted by on 27 June 2014 12:59
  • Profile picture of Janet
    It all depends on the practitioner only as good as the practitioner, many are poor like doctors. It should cover more general things plus emotional.

    Did you have an imprinted informational remedy (the same concept as a homoeopathic remedy), and by passing the information back to the body using a safe low-energy laser plus drops.
    Posted by Janet on 14 April 2014 12:09
  • Profile picture of J.M.
    Had the test done today. But the gal doing the test would not give me the test results. Is this common?
    Posted by J.M. on 1 February 2014 00:28
  • Lz
    I have had asyra testing but I'm surprised they told you it was allergy testing or intolerance testing because it's not really!

    What it does do is at that moment in time it tells you what your body can't cope with too well or requires more energy than benefit to digest so you might not be getting problems with that food group but your body is using way too much energy to digest that thing than it's receiving benefit from. And cutting it out for 10 days or up to 6 weeks could just give your body time to remake the enzymes needed.

    So really you should have been told that if you wanted a herbal or homoeopathic remedy to help or even a retest after the 6 weeks of cutting the foods out

    I wasn't a big believer in homoeopathy I'll be honest. But I took the remedy with a very sceptical mind and found in the 6th week I'd suddenly developed lots of odd symptoms like increased ur unwary frequency bowel frequency, and acne which actually resolved within 24 hours of me stopping the remedy!! As much as I didn't want to believe it it was doing something!

    I don't think asyra is a good way to allergy test but for intolerances as long as you know it's not telling you about permanent intolerances and just what you could do with cutting out for 10 days to 6 weeks with a retest and you understand that then it's fine
    Posted by Lz on 22 January 2014 12:35
  • Profile picture of Emily CB
    I see that you too had mixed opinions of this test. A friend of mine too took this offer and it resulted in me consoling her on the phone for an hour because the test results of the food that she had to avoid were so wide fish, foods containing histamine and a little rare like millet which she had never consumed. Also there was no follow up or support for the way forward. Basically you have these food intolerances… Good Luck! She had so many questions.

    I have multiple food intolerances I do believe in alternative medicine mainly because GPs just handed out antibiotics to me without considering my diet or overall well-being and actually contributed to lowering my immune system. Alternative medicine has given me answers such as discovering my food intolerances through a nutritionist, kinesiologist and Chinese medicine. However I had to figure out my diet, what I could eat, what good alternatives were and what tastes great. I feel like a completely different person since improving my diet.

    I have my own website now to enable people with food intolerances to have access to free from food, ideas for delicious tasting recipes, access to health related news and advice on what really are great alternatives. Please stop by and take a look. I welcome your opinions.

    Just a pointer that normally the foods that we crave and eat in large quantities on a regular bases are what we are intolerant too.

    Variety and fresh food in our diet is key.
    Posted by Emily CB on 21 December 2013 23:12
  • Profile picture of Amanda
    In brief: I have been attending a practice in Eccleston (near Chorley). Mike is a physio and wellness practitioner who I consulted with a sciatic nerve issue and during the course of this treatment he recommended and performed 2 basic Asyra tests over a 6-8 week period.

    The first found 49 'issues' - not just related to my sciatic nerve you understand, but he believes in addressing the 'whole' body in order to treat his patients .

    Mike imprinted 'solutions' using a laser 'pen' and the pad, placing my hand on it to get the imprint/treatment. Then I had the choice of whether I wanted to take drops to reinforce the treatment over a period of 3-4 weeks - no pressure to buy. I chose to do this, paying £5 for the glass bottle & dropper.

    I too was informed I would benefit from acidophilus for one of the issues (I have been told this previously). My practitioner did have the correct dosage in stock, so I bought it from him as I know he has sourced it carefully and, as someone mentioned earlier, some outlets don't stock acidophilus with concentrations necessary to be effective.

    The second test (approx 6 weeks later) showed that 41 of the original 49 issues were no longer of significance - they had been 'resolved'. I was imprinted during the session and again I came away with more drops to take for a further 3-4 weeks.

    Mike also suggested I take various items to the next session to 'test' to see if they were:
    a) beneficial
    b) harmful
    c) neutral

    I am currently taking a number of minerals/vitamins etc recommended by a diet book (quite a pricey collection). When tested, a couple proved to be harmful (at this time) and a couple were of negligible significance. I tested the decaf coffee I am currently drinking: fine, a Costa coffee with vanilla shot was harmful (no surprise there), my low carb whey protein: beneficial, as were various other vitamins/minerals etc

    I also took in a sun cream I use regularly (I have v sensitive skin and wanted to ensure I wasn't harming it) - no issue there.
    I am thinking of taking other creams as well as more food items I eat regularly to see what the Asyra test comes up with!

    I found all of this very interesting/useful and each item tested only took 10 seconds. I would imagine that if you had food intolerance or allergy issues this would be an excellent way of checking what agrees/disagrees with you!

    My practitioner also did some other tests: emotional/stress etc which appeared to be very accurate - surprisingly so.

    He has used the Asyra machine during other sessions to check muscolo-skeletal issues, to get a second opinion (you might say) in trying to solve my sciatic nerve problem. It pinpointed quickly and accurately two vertebrae that were of concern during this particular session, as Mike had suspected.

    As far as cost is concerned, Mike charges £40/hour for whatever treatment he performs and for whatever equipment he uses (although often I am there for longer with no extra charge).

    I know that the Asyra machine can perform up to 200 tests, I am interested to see what else it can tell me.

    I am keeping an open-mind about this 'voodoo/hocus pocus' machine, as I like to joke, as when you try to explain to others how it works, they look at you in a very skeptical manner and you do feel lie you are talking a load of rubbish!

    I guess only time will tell how effective it really is...however, I do not believe that modern medicine has all the answers.
    I do believe that pharmaceutical companies have vested interests in ensuring we keep taking pills and I do believe that the Earth is round... but maybe that's because I have travelled much of it!
    Posted by Amanda on 21 July 2013 00:19
  • The Ki Clinic
    This is in reply to the comment from Pat CAMPS,who visited our Clinic for a Food Intolerance Test.
    Everyone gets the same treatment which is of a very high professional service and is based on a 1-1 personal consultation,eveything is explained in the simplest of terms and is easy to understand,the client is allways asked 'do you understand and can i help you further'.
    This particular client was given 110%,and when given the results of her test, the client informed me that she was not willing to change.
    The Documents which were the test results were fully explained,and she was quite happy and friendly when she left our clinic.This really disgusts me what this client has written,if you visit our website or call at our clinic ,we have lots of WRITTEN TESTIMONIALS ,to indicate our service is exceptional.In some cases like this,you cannot please everyone,especially when they are not willing to change.
    Posted by The Ki Clinic on 26 April 2013 19:31
  • Profile picture of Pat Camps
    Hi, I visited Ki Clinic in Chorley yesterday for a similar test for which I paid £39 instead of £110 for a number of food intolerance tests (how one knows that you're getting your allocated number of food tests God only knows). In actual fact I ended paying £49 because the practitioner there got a further £10 out of me within 5 minutes to do allergins aswell! Frankly this was the biggest load of rubbish and waste of money I have ever experienced. Do not bother doing one!! The documents I was given at the end make no sense at all. I went because recently I'd had a reaction to some foods which I couldn't identify. I had all the ingredients to that food and I have come away none the wiser despite the very patronising practitioner telling me (again within 5 minutes that he knows exactly what my reaction was a result of) and despite the fact that I paid an extra £10 for allergin testing. This really was the most unprofessional thing I've ever seen.
    Posted by Pat Camps on 26 April 2013 08:02
  • Profile picture of Paul
    Hi Kara,

    Thank you for the information. Your explanation is much better than the one that the practitioner I met gave.

    It's a shame that it can't export results in anything other than PDF format. We can still get data from PDF, we would just need to capture and convert it first.

    It would be great if we could integrate the results into this website - e.g. let people upload their Asyra into their user profile on this website, so we can then create a custom food profile for them. I have created a custom food profile for myself, based on my Asyra results - I just had to type everything in manually. It's a low priority for us at the moment, but it's on our to-do list for consideration :-)
    Posted by on 18 March 2013 10:40
  • Profile picture of KaraMiaVernon
    Hi Paul,

    As an Asyra Practitioner I would like to thank you for your detailed comments and information.

    However, you are incorrect when you say that it "pass an electric current though my body.". This is not the case. Essentially, all things in the universe can be "reduced" to a frequency, this frequency can be shown as a sine wave, this sine wave can be stored in binary in the Asyra and then it re-creates these frequencies and send them into the room that you are sitting in. The batons are highly sensitive readers of your bodies response to those frequencies. They either support, stress, or weaken you. This is then displayed on the screen. You would be amazed at what your physical being can do in a matter of seconds! Electrons flow pretty quickly..

    I have had great success with this technology, it has been around for over 35 years and the Asyra is the best example of this.

    I wish you all the best with your health and vitality and your interesting blog.

    Keep up the great work,

    Kara Mia
    Naturopath

    PS - PDF format is the only format the tests come in
    Posted by on 15 March 2013 11:50
  • Guest
    Just a little comment, pasta is digested by enzymes that break down starches and carbs and amylase, malt distase and glucoamylase etc, pineapple will not help, it supports digestion of protein mainly.
    Posted by Guest on 25 October 2012 11:30
  • Guest
    Hi everyone just wanted to put my two penneth in.

    I actually have regular Asyra testing (every 6 or so weeks) and it’s a shame you all seem to have seen people who do not use this amazing technology properly. My homeopath is amazing, she charges £95 for a full body test (£195 just for a food intolerance test is a rip off). I can be in session with her for 2 hours on a normal basis. The first time I saw her I was there for 3 hours! I do have health issues and using Asyra has been invaluable to me. Hunt around for a good homeopath who understands what Asyra can do. You should get a full print out after your session and have it explained to you as it is complicated to the layman.

    The food allergy bit is this, EVERYTHING you eat or drink causes a reaction in your body good and bad. Anything you have eaten previous to the test (in the last two days) should be ignored to start with as most foodstuffs we eat in modern times is not perfect for us and causes a mild bad reaction. This is why I always keep a list of everything I have eaten and drunk previous to my test. If things come up that you have not ever eaten or that you have not eaten recently then you can start eliminating those first.

    As far as the test being illegal in the USA, it is approved by the FDA so that’s rubbish, though I dare say the large drug companies would like it to be! Plus in America, a lot of the herbs and supplements are being banned. I love the Asyra and I believe it to be the most amazing health tool, but like all things even doctors; if you get a bad one you don’t benefit change the company you use and try again!
    Posted by Guest on 4 August 2012 07:32
  • gg
    Yes, I have had this test and it was explained differently to me than you have described. Firstly, my understanding is that certain foods 'stress' the body when eaten and others strengthen the body, I guess this is based on the perpetual fluctuation described in Chinese Medicine as yin and yang.

    So, what I have chosen to do based on the advice given to me and the report received, is exclude for a period of time the foods that 'stress' my system and then when it is the appropriate time, re-introduce them individually to ascertain the ones that wreak the most havoc.

    I have only been excluding certain foods for a week now and I am aware of less wheezing and coughing already and an increase in my overall energy.

    I shall remain open minded laced with a healthy dose of skepticism, after all, this may have occurred at this moment anyway.
    Posted by gg on 9 July 2012 20:35
  • Profile picture of Paul
    Hi AH,

    What I've put on here is all of the information that I was given, so yes for me, it was the full report. I will be interested if you get anything else.

    I wasn't given any drops. The report does suggest that I am deficient in some vitamins, but it doesn’t make any recommendations as to which foods or vitamins I should be consuming to balance this. The practitioner didn’t suggest anything either, which is bad because I would have bought them from his shop – so it would have been an easy sale!

    I haven't tried fully cutting anything out yet, but I have certainly cut back on the things that it has highlighted and I now mainly drink pineapple juice (as well as water) when I go out, because the reports show that I have some trouble digesting foods such as pasta – and pineapple juice helps with this.

    One easy way to help me cut down is to update my personal diet settings in my GetMeCooking user profile, to list all of the foods that I am not supposed to eat. Then I only get shown recipes that are okay for me to eat :-)

    I think one 'problem' I have with the Asyra test is that because I haven’t got any real, distinct, notable issues (e.g. IBS, high blood pressure, high/low sugar levels), I can’t really tell if modifying my diet has any real positive consequences for me, unless I have several tests over a long period of time (e.g. one every 2 months for a year). If an ASRA test becomes available again (at a different place from where I had it before – so there is no history of my results), I might go for it, just so I can compare the results.
    Posted by on 13 March 2012 18:11
  • AH
    Hi Paul,

    I just had the test done this week using a coupon also. I was lucky as the clinic I went to had a practising GP there and she actually spoke with me for for nearly 1 1/2 hours.

    I'm not sure what to make of it either. We talked through my results (different intolerances to yours) and I'm inclined to try cutting out the 'intolerances' as I do have digestive problems and have done almost all my life. Nothing severe but something I've wanted to get to the bottom of. I haven't been sent the full report yet. Although I was surprised looking at your report that it is not broken down. Is it the full report? It's a bit odd, e.g. on yours that fruits is weakened but it shows kiwis as balanced. I thought it would list all the fruits it tested for... and in your case show which fruits are not good for you. As well as all the others listed. Let me know if I've read it wrong?

    I was also given some drops and told to drop 6 drops under my tongue twice a day and she also suggested, after testing me a second and third time during our chat, I should get 3 supplements either online or from Holland and Barrett - acidophilus (40 billion) (I'll have to get this online as H&B only sell up to 4 billion... this number refers to the bacteria, manganese-copper-sulphate and chromium. I'm going to give it a go. Why not?

    So have you tried cutting certain things out and if so how has the result been?

    Like you, I wouldn't have paid the full price. But I do find it interesting and having researched food allergies and intolerances, this was good to try as it is seemingly extremely difficult to pinpoint allergies.
    Posted by AH on 9 March 2012 23:03
  • Seyhan
    Hi Paul,
    haha funny, we have exact birth date, except I am 8 days older than you, born 1st September. :)
    I have gone to the Asyra test exactly same way, with a coupon. And even most of my report results is very similar to yours.. how coincidental is that. Most suprisingly, like some other people claim about food allergy tests, whatever I am having at the moment regularly-and almost all are very healthy choices- came out as 'allergic to'.

    It is quite annoying especially to see lots of very healthy food and many things classified as allergic to. Now, even though I won't completely comply to it, I will be always concious of what was in the test.
    Posted by Seyhan on 22 February 2012 23:53
  • Profile picture of Paul
    I haven't had any follow-up sessions - I only went to it the first time because it was discounted and I was curious. For the time spent with the consultant, I though £59 was a bit steep and I would have been very upset if I had paid the full price of £195.

    It sounds like you spent a lot more time with the consultant than I did - and you didn't get an intolerance test! Why was that? The intolerance test took less than a minute for me. I didn't get scanned by a laser, or have any drops.

    It would be interesting to see how your results compare to mine :-)

    I don't know if the Asyra Pro test is good or not - and I haven't found any conclusive evidence on the Internet either way. That's partly why I wrote this article - I'm hoping that someone independent will come along and give me evidence to say if it's scientifically proven or not.
    Posted by on 1 February 2012 20:44
  • Profile picture of a guest
    Hi Paul

    Have you had any follow up sessions since or found out any more?

    I had my first session at the weekend. I was hoping for a food intolerance test but just got tested for weaknesses/problem areas.

    It took 90 mins and there was lots of questions about my lifestyle and health.

    I was also scanned with a laser (pen type of device) and given some drops that had been programmed by the machine. Am still awaiting the email breakdown and herbs to be prescribed.

    I'm unsure what to make of it, and I notice that there are some sites in America claiming it is not only a scam, but that it is illegal and practitioners can be prosecuted for using it!
    Posted by Guest on 30 January 2012 16:15